Be a Part of Important Research on LGBTQ Suicide Prevention

"While the majority of LGBTQ folks do not attempt suicide and do not die by suicide there are pretty huge disparities between the suicide attempt rates of LGBTQ individuals and the population at large. In the population at large it is estimated that roughly 5% of people have attempted suicide. In the LGBTQ community, between 12% and 19% of LGB adults have reported attempting suicide across multiple studies, and on the National Transgender Discrimination Survey 41% of trans* folks reported having attempted suicide…The hope with this study is that by understanding the experiences of all people from across the spectrum of gender, sex, and sexual identities we’ll be able to help further develop an understanding of the emotional needs of LGBTQ individuals and may, in turn, be able to inform the creation of suicide prevention materials for the LGBTQ community and therapeutic work with LGBTQ people."

My friend and colleague Joe Orovecz is recruiting for a seriously important study. He’s written more about LGBTQ suicide, suicide prevention, his study, and what is required in participation after the click-through.

"…The study is open to all individuals (NOT just those who have experienced suicidal thoughts or have had a suicide attempt) who a) identify as a sexual minority identity (e.g., asexual, bisexual, gay, lesbian, pansexual), b) identify as trans* (e.g., genderqueer, transgender, FTM, MTF), c) have experienced a gender transition, but don’t identify as trans* (e.g., stealth), and/or d) are intersex. If you’re interested in participating you must also be 18 years of age or older and must currently reside within the United States of America.”

Link to Study: https://louisvilleeducation.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3VFdVQseMcgXInH 

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"I had no desire to destroy myself even if it destroyed the machine; I wanted freedom, not destruction. It was exhausting, for no matter what the scheme I conceived, there was one constant flaw – myself. There was no getting around it. I could no more escape than I could think of my identity. Perhaps, I thought, the two things are involved with one another. When I discover who I am, I’ll be free."

Ralph Ellison, who was born on this day in 1914, wrote this in Invisible Man, which was a critical novel for me at multiple points in my life,  particularly during my transition.

"I was looking for myself and asking everyone except myself questions which I, and only I, could answer. It took me a long time and much painful boomeranging of my expectations to achieve a realization everyone else appears to have been born with: That I am nobody but myself."

Ralph Ellison, who was born on this day in 1914, wrote this in Invisible Man, which was a critical novel for me at multiple points in my life,  particularly during my transition.

This one is my favorite. This and #IyamwhatIam

"I was pulled this way and that for longer than I can remember. And my problem was that I always tried to go in everyone’s way but my own. I have also been called one thing and then another while no one really wished to hear what I called myself. So after years of trying to adopt the opinions of others I finally rebelled. I am an invisible man."

Ralph Ellison, who was born on this day in 1914, wrote this in Invisible Man, which was a critical novel for me at multiple points in my life,  particularly during my transition.

"I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me. Like the bodiless heads you see sometimes in circus sideshows, it is as though I have been surrounded by mirrors of hard, distorting glass. When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves or figments of their imagination, indeed, everything and anything except me."

Ralph Ellison, who was born on this day in 1914, wrote this in Invisible Man, which was a critical novel for me at multiple points in my life,  particularly during my transition.

"Life is to be lived, not controlled; and humanity is won by continuing to play in face of certain defeat."

Ralph Ellison, who was born on this day in 1914, wrote this in Invisible Man, which was a critical novel for me at multiple points in my life,  particularly during my transition.